Fishes and Shellfishes

Détraqués et traqués, ils sont sous pression. Le pillage commence sur l’estran avec la pêche à pied de loisir et s’étend en haute mer. L’effort de pêche est de plus en plus violent et se radicalise. L’Union Européenne n’hésite plus à électrocuter la mer pour faire sortir les soles des fonds. Les poissons sauvages sont réduits en farine pour nourrir des poissons d’élevage. Les aires de reproduction et de nourrissage sont détruites. Certaines huîtres sont des OGM. Robin des Bois embarque, informe, interpelle, pèse dans les Conventions internationales et incite toutes les parties prenantes à réfléchir avant d’agir.

Crabs Pinched by PCB

20 Jul 2011

The port of Rouen wants to open a new disposal site for the sludge from dredging in the Seine’s bay. The public inquiry was closed yesterday. This 2 million meters³ “experience” covers itself in scientific fuss like the follow-up of the bioaccumulation of toxic elements contained in the sludge, thanks to the placing of 7 cages of mussels laid 2 to 10 km from the disposal site. This animal experimentation led by Ifremer is totally useless in regards to the ecological disaster that strikes a blow from heavy metals and PCB, endocrinal disruptors, at the ensemble of the Seine’s bay from the east to the west and from the top to the bottom.

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Fish Eat Whales

12 Jul 2011

The 63rd annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) will take place from July 11th to 14th on the Channel Island Jersey.

Pro-whaling countries often state that whales must be culled to avoid competition with human fisheries. Japanese “scientific” documents show images of whales’ stomachs overflowing with small pelagic fish. According to Robin des Bois a defender of whales, one must continue to demonstrate that whales have positive effects not only on the world’s marine ecosystem but on all ecosystems. We cannot accuse whales of taking all and giving nothing to the oceans, while it is Man who takes all and gives nothing but pollution and increasing disturbances.

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(Français) La vigilance reste de mise à Sète

9 May 2011

(Français) La vigilance reste de mise à Sète

Only in French.

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(Français) De la Croix-Rouge au thon rouge

4 May 2011

(Français) De la Croix-Rouge au thon rouge

Only in French.

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Libya still Manages their Embassy in Sète

12 Apr 2011

Despite the current conflict and the break in diplomatic relations between France and Libya, the city of Sète and its tourist heart continue to represent Libya, as always without problem, the regime of the famous colonel. Ten tuna fishing boats proudly claiming their homeport and their administrative and financial connections with Tripoli adorn the streets and terraces of the cafés. The riverboats in Sète departing the old city’s bridge leave to the right a part of the Libyan fleet while declaiming through a megaphone, “Since forever the tuna fishing boats of Sète fish for bluefin tuna exclusively in the Mediterranean.”

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The radioactive contamination of fish

25 Mar 2011

The French and European authorities don’t appear to have grasped all the difficulties raised by the control of fish and other seafood products likely to have been contaminated by atmospheric deposits and liquid radioactive matter in the coastal and deep sea regions of the North West Pacific. This is the most productive area in the world. It is exploited by fleets from Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan and Russia. IUU fishing – illegal, non-declared and non-regulated – is very active here.

Global catches are approximately 20 million tonnes per year. Catches of Japanese anchovy and mackerel reach 1.5 million tonnes and 900 thousand tonnes per year respectively. Squid, cuttlefish and octopus catches are in the order of 1 million tonnes per year, and Japanese calamari and scallops are in the order of 1 million tonnes and 200 thousand tonnes per year respectively.

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(Français) Partenariat franco-libyen sur le thon rouge

2 Mar 2011

Only in French.

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Bigeye Tuna is in the Red

27 Nov 2010

Not the Same Old Tuna #5
The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas and its adjacent seas – ICCAT.
17th -27th November Paris

The bigeye tuna in the Southern Atlantic grows quickly: 105 cm at 3 years old, 140 cm at 5 and 163 cm at 7. But it is disappearing even faster. The Gulf of Guinea houses the principle spawning ground, however the last assessment of bigeye tuna was taken in 2007, and the latest fishing figures date from 2005. Yet the contracted parties, notably the fishing states, were not in agreement over a project supported by the USA, the EU, and Japan, who would have imposed an onboard observer program and a 2 month suspension of all fishing activity. According to the Scientific Committee, “the bigeye tuna situation is worrisome.” The situation could deteriorate quickly with the movement of purse seine and longline vessels from the Indian Ocean to the Southern Atlantic over fear of piracy. Illegal fishing activity is suspected to be prevalent in this fishing ground and the total admissible catch for 2011 is set at 85,000 tons.

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Where Are They Now?

26 Nov 2010

Not the Same Old Tuna – #3
PA – 2, The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas and its adjacent seas – ICCAT.
17th -27th November Paris

During the Panel session number 2, responsible for the conservation of bluefin tuna, the fate of the ships announced as “removed” was often mentioned. The EU, for example, announced that 126 purse seine vessels and 130 longline vessels have been “removed” from the bluefin tuna fleet between 2008 and 2010, without giving precise information on the ships’ demolition, conversion or any other mode of decommissioning. Contracting parties from the Eastern Mediterranean also announced the “removal” of fishing boats and tugs assigned to transporting cages without providing detailed information on their demolition or their redeployment for another purpose.

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ICCAT in its Lifeboat

26 Nov 2010

Not the Same Old Tuna – #4
The International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas and its adjacent seas – ICCAT.
17th -27th November Paris

In Paris, ICCAT contracting countries are multiplying good news announcements, positive resolutions and promises of finances to save tuna and to show the image of a united family and of world citizens.

However, the reality is the complete opposite. The declarations of catches, the statistics, the lists of ships involved, and the annual reports are, in general, truncated, manipulated, or nonexistent. Back payments of subscription accumulate. Absentees are given the benefit of the doubt, such as Algeria, suspected to be involved in illegal activities of bluefin tuna in 2008 and 2009 – the Algerian delegation arrived one day before the meeting finishes.

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