Post-disaster Waste

(Français) Incendie et pollution

21 Aug 2012

Only in French.

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(Français) Incendies en Russie

1 Aug 2012

Only in French.

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Caution : fire risk !

10 Jul 2012

Robin des Bois and GEIDE post-disaster

 

attention-au-feu-RobinDesBois-2012Nobody can be blamed for the outbreak and consequences of earthquakes of large magnitude. For forest fires, it’s a different story. Only the lightning escapes human responsibility. Man is the cause of more than 9 out of 10 forest fires.

Barbecues, gas stoves, cigarettes, motorcycle incursions, quadbikes or other vehicles with internal combustion engines, campfires, fireworks and combustible wastes are all risks of fire in an environment that is vulnerable to conflagration. A spark can ignite thousands of acres and a small fire can in a few seconds become uncontrollable.

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(Français) Pour la culture du risque

20 Jun 2012

(Français) Pour la culture du risque

Only in French.

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(Français) Torpiller les déchets du tsunami et polluer

10 Apr 2012

(Français) Torpiller les déchets du tsunami et polluer

Only in French.

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(Français) Incendie en Seine-Saint-Denis

16 Feb 2012

Only in French.

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(Français) Boues rouges : un mal mondial

3 Oct 2011

Only in French.

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The waste from the Japanese earthquake and tsunami

1 Sep 2011

The waste from the Japanese earthquake and tsunami

1. Radioactive contamination

On 11 March 2011 there was a legal vacuum in Japan concerning radioactive waste resulting from a nuclear disaster. Current waste management Law places technical and financial responsibility for waste from natural disasters with local authorities. However, this excludes radioactive waste. The Law on rehabilitation of contaminated soil excludes from its scope radioactive soils and waste. The Law on the management of radioactive materials and waste only concerns those inside the nuclear plants.

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Millions of Stowaway Passengers Circling Around the Pacific Ocean

31 May 2011

Millions of Stowaway Passengers Circling Around the Pacific Ocean

The tsunami which followed the Japanese earthquake devastated around 300km of coastal cities, towns, farmlands and greenhouses along Japan’s Pacific coastline. The wave was reported to have spread up to 10km (six miles) inland and inundated around 500km². Not only did the earthquake and tsunami create an estimated 25 million tonnes of rubble, but when the tsunami receded it dragged with it countless quantities of waste in the flooded zone.

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The After Shock

15 Apr 2011

Climatic, geological, or anthropogenic natural disasters produce in a couple of seconds, hours or days, enormous amounts of waste, so much so that authorities are unable to handle the quantity with ordinary means. The rupture of “lifelines”, namely water, electricity, transportation routes and communication lines, send survivors into a deep confusion. The accumulation of rubble and waste increases the shock of the populations and postpones the first steps towards the return to normalcy.

The 3 million tonnes of rubble generated by the earthquake in Los Angeles in January 1994 led the city to reinforce and multiply its recycling capacities. Provisional transit and elimination sites for future earthquakes were pre-selected.

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