Arctic and Antarctic

Les milieux polaires sont les aimants de la Terre. Ils ont commencé par attirer les explorateurs, les chasseurs de baleines, de phoques et d’ours polaires. Ils ont ensuite captivé les scientifiques et les militaires, attiré les touristes, les concessions minières et les extracteurs d’hydrocarbures. La grande pêche s’y déchaine. L’Océan Glacial Arctique n’est protégé par aucune convention internationale. En Antarctique il faut empêcher la destruction du statut protecteur, en Arctique il faut le construire.

Robin des Bois and the OSPAR Commission. Cork, Ireland. June 26-29, 2017

7 Jul 2017

Robin des Bois and the OSPAR Commission. Cork, Ireland. June 26-29, 2017

OSPAR is an International Cooperation Convention dedicated to the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic, which came into effect in 1998. France, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Finland, Iceland , Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the European Union are members, as well as Luxembourg and Switzerland due to the influence that the rivers flowing through them have on the Atlantic. Robin des Bois (Robin Hood) has had observer status at the OSPAR Commission since 2005.

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OSPAR loses the Arctic

22 Mar 2017

OSPAR loses the Arctic

Report

OSPAR comes from the fusion in 1992 of the Paris Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution from Land-based Sources and the Oslo Convention for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by navy and aircraft immersion operations. The latter was initiated following the shock of the oil spill from the Torrey Canyon March 18, 1967.
OSPAR is dedicated to the protection of the northeast Atlantic Ocean. It is a pilot fish. The work of its 5 committees – Biodiversity, Offshore Industry, Radioactive Substances, Environmental Impact of Human Activities, Hazardous Substances and Eutrophication – allows better understanding and combat of the many pressures on marine ecosystems from the open sea of Portugal to the Arctic Ocean. This success is notably materialized by a quality status report without concession of the OSPAR zone in 2010 (1). Seven years later, the OSPAR pilot fish is threatened of asphyxia by the Arctic countries. Robin des Bois has returned from the Biodiversity and Offshore Industry committees which gathered in Berlin and in Oslo the first two weeks of March.

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THE COP SHOW

30 Nov 2015

The global warming dramaturgy is prompting to cartoon. In its name, so-called philosophers, real politicians, and disoriented NGOs are spreading rumours.

It’s wrong to say that global warming has caused modern human migration. This migration is due to incompetent leaders, religious intolerance, civil war, bombardments, the pillaging of natural resources, and the poverty that results from this.

It’s also misleading to claim that the increasingly dire death tolls of cyclones and other hazards are directly caused by global warming. Haphazard urbanization, makeshift housing, and deforestation are the main reasons.

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(Français) Frissons en Antarctique

24 Nov 2015

Only in French.

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Premiere in the Arctic : whale meat goes through the North-East Passage

3 Aug 2015

The Winter Bay belonging to a European ship owner just left the port of Tromsø in Norway. She is now sailing in the Barents Sea. She carries about 1800 tons of whale meat from Iceland. The Winter Bay is expected in Osaka, Japan, on August 28. The Arctic option, 14,500 km, allows the ship to avoid diplomatic complications, environmental NGO protests and the usual stops in West Africa and South Africa.

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(Français) Suspension de la chasse à la baleine en Antarctique

19 Sep 2014

Only in French.

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Science too Lethal

31 Mar 2014

The International Court of Justice ordered Japan to stop its whaling program JARPA II and therefore cease all whaling activities in the Antarctic. Since 1987, Japan has killed over 10,000 whales in the Southern Seas.

In its decision delivered this morning, at The Hague, the Court declared that the “scientific whaling” program in Antarctica, as it has been designed and implemented by Japan, entails a disproportionate number of whales hunted and killed. According to the Court, Japan did not provide adequate explications to justify the lethal take of whales particularly minke whales. The Court pointed out that the number of whales killed under the framework of “Japanese scientific whaling” is offset by financial reasons. The product from treating whales – which is to say the commercialization of whale meat – finances the whaling campaign carried out by the factory ship the Nisshin Maru and support vessels.

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Not on the Same Whale Wave

16 Jul 2013

Information note N°8
Whales at the International Court of Justice
The Hague, The Netherlands, 2nd hearing of Japan, July 15th – 16th

 

Over the last 3 weeks, at the Peace Palace in The Hague (Netherlands), the past and the future of whaling has been explored in all its scope. In their closing remarks on July 16th, Japan implied that if the Court declared a decision in favour of Australia’s case, it would be the equivalent of forcing a State to abide to a decision that they did not agree to. On this note they reemphasized that when they agreed to the 1982 moratorium, which came into force for Japan in 1986, it was uniquely in light of this provision being reviewed. If Japan was to wake up one morning and find that the Convention that they agreed on had changed over night then the only way out would be to leave.

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Australia: Fights Back

12 Jul 2013

Information note N°7

Whales at the International Court of Justice

The Hague, The Netherlands, 2nd hearing of Australia, July 9th – 10th

The second round of hearings for Australia was presented from July 9th to July 10th and announced a call to order in the Court by the Attorney-General of Australia, Marc Dreyfus. Australia’s return to the stand signalled the return, in force, of clear legal arguments. Australia restated that their case was “about the failure of one country to comply with its international legal obligations not to conduct commercial whaling, an obligation which that country accepted voluntarily but then immediately began to subvert.” Australia also hammered down the unfounded arguments that Japan had unjustly presented against them in their first round of hearings.

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New Zealand: A Collective Vision for Whales

9 Jul 2013

Information note N°6

Whales at the International Court of Justice

The Hague, The Netherlands, New Zealand Intervening, July 8

During a short intervention on Monday July 8th New Zealand reflected on the historical context of the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling (ICRW). They emphasised the fact that the Convention had developed from a body regulating unilateral whaling interests to a collective body for the conservation and the protection of whales. New Zealand, a founding member, noted that as early as the 1930s the need for conservation as a common objective was called upon due to ongoing “rampant whaling”. Unfortunately, even though the International Whaling Commission (IWC) was formally established in 1937, it was not until after WWII that efforts towards conservation were taken which, according to Ms Ridings speaking on behalf of New Zealand, was “too little too late”.

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